Wednesday, 13 February 2013

Top 10 Highest Fibre Vegetables (Cooked and Raw)

If you’re trying to increase your daily fibre intake, eating more vegetables is a great place to start. Not only are vegetables packed with vitamins and minerals, many have a significant amount of fibre too.

Fibrous vegetables are particularly filling and low in fat, which is always a bonus when following a weight loss diet. Plus, when we eat fibre, our body has to work harder at digesting it, burning off even more calories.

A diet high in fibre can be beneficial in helping to lower cholesterol, control blood sugar levels and prevent constipation.


The fibre content in vegetables can differ, depending on whether it’s eaten raw or cooked. Therefore, I’ve produced two high fibre vegetable lists below showing the fibre content in vegetables per 100g for raw (top chart) and cooked (bottom chart).


Top 10 Highest Fibre Vegetables



Raw Vegetables
Fibre per 100g
Calories per 100g

Globe Artichoke
5.4g
47
Parsnip
4.9g
75
Brussels Sprouts
3.8g
43
Celeriac
3.7g
18
Okra
3.2g
33
Peas (Frozen)
3.1g
42
Kale
3.1g
33
Sweet Potato
3.0g
86
Aubergine (Eggplant)
3.0g
25
Broccoli
2.6g
34






Cooked Vegetables
Fibre per 100g
Calories per 100g

Globe Artichoke
8.6g
53
Parsnip
3.6g
71
Sweet Potato
3.3g
90
Broccoli 
3.3g
35
Celeriac 
3.3g
15
Peas (Frozen)
3.1g
52
Carrots
3.0g
35
Brussels Sprouts
2.6g
36
Okra
2.5g
22
Aubergine (Eggplant)
2.5g
35

Wherever possible, try to eat vegetables in their natural state (raw), in order to gain optimal nutritional benefits. However, some vegetables, e.g. celeriac or sweet potato, are better eaten when cooked as this helps makes them palatable. To retain maximum nutrients and fibre, it’s best to lightly steam or stir fry, and finish cooking while they’re still bright in colour.

If you can’t access fresh vegetables, look for canned or frozen varieties instead. These generally contain as many nutrients as fresh vegetables, sometimes more, because they’re canned or frozen soon after picking. The fibre content may vary depending on brands chosen.


*Although the avocado is a technically a fruit, it’s usually included in the vegetable category. So for the purposes of the top 10 highest fibre vegetables list, I haven’t included it. However, if you’re interested, they have 3.4g of fibre and 190 calories per 100g.

**Due to the complexity of ascertaining the exact fibre content in vegetables, you are likely to find varying estimates depending on the source used. 


Sources:

USDA Nutrient Database 
Nutrition for Life (Lisa Hark PhD & Dr Darwin Deen)
Various Nutritional Labels.

© Diets and Calories 2013

2 comments :

  1. I love vegetables and always miss them if I don't have it. Have never really thought of comparing the fibre content of the different vegetables in detail as each veg has something to offer. Variety is so important. Interesting read!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too. I have to have veggies with every main meal, mainly to fill up on. You're absolutely right, variety is key to getting as many nutrients as possible.

      Delete

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